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NLNature in Numbers

Members Sightings Sght. Comments Sght. Photos Sght. Likes Sght. Views
3,835 9,300 2,881 13,843 8,464 5,126,457

Welcome our newest member, Glennjuike (joined Friday, January 18, 2019). Have you joined yet?!

Did you know our most liked sighting was observed on Friday, January 1, 2010 by The Coyote Kid. It is liked by 55 visitors!

And our most viewed sighting was observed on Wednesday, October 6, 2010 by sam. It was viewed 16663 times!

Most recent comments

0 days ago Tclenche made the following comment on the observation of unknown seal posted on January 18, 2019:
size is one, Harbour seals are a lot smaller on average.
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0 days ago Elijah made the following comment on the observation of unknown seal posted on January 18, 2019:
That seems to be the species. How do Harp Seals differ from Harbour Seals other than the black harp pattern?  (reply...)
0 days ago Tclenche made the following comment on the observation of unknown seal posted on January 18, 2019:
looks like Harp Seals to me.
(reply...)
11 days ago Elijah made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
My eel sightings have been in significant 'points' of the two  Britannia brooks. An example of this is at the other brook where the water pipes cross under the road and form a pool deeper than the rest of the stream. I am unsure if the eels prefer calmer waters, the crevices to shelter in, or they simply stay there because of its nonconformity to the shallow brook. 

My other eel sightings have been along the edges of ponds. My eel sightings at Bowring Park have been after dark, so nighttime might be a productive time to search. 
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11 days ago Tclenche made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
i will be looking there as the weather allows. I would like to see how many watersheds on Random Island have Eel populations.

(reply...)
11 days ago Elijah made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
The previously-mentioned brook is an easy spot to search when the water level is low. The eels seem to use the wood and frame as shelter.  (reply...)
11 days ago Tclenche made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
I used to see Eels in the old brackish pond here in Petley, before it was turned into the small boat basin. I was searching the Rattle for Eels this past summer with no luck. I was told it was always a great place to see them in the past.
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11 days ago Elijah made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
I am not sure of the exact size, though I would say they were near fifty-five centimetres. 

Although the general population is depleting, and I only find a few eels a year, I have seen no apparent indication of decline (my sightings may have been  simply lucky, and an island-wide survey may provide stark contrast to my observations). 

I have also seen eels in Harry's Pond at Salmon Cove and at the duck pond at Bowring Park, and a relative has seen them in the pond at Topsail Beach. 

At this beach in Britannia, the brackish end of the brook flowing by the old boardwalk is best for finding eels (this sighting was from that brook), though I have found a couple in the other brook. The former brook is cut off from the ocean, and an old piece of wood lies on a frame the mud. When the water is low, turning the wood over often reveals an eel. I believe that they become trapped in that brook while migrating to the ocean (eels spawn in saltwater). 

I find that the best time of year to find eels is in summer and fall. My eel sightings are rare, yet so are my searches for them. 
(reply...)
12 days ago Tclenche made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
how big were the Eels?

(reply...)
12 days ago Tclenche made the following comment on the observation of American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) posted on October 03, 2018:
this is a great sighting! I have not seen an Eel on Random Island in years. I have been looking in all of the places people tell me that they used to find them. I have a feeling that like many other forms of life, they are declining in numbers!

(reply...)